825

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Monday. Today is f#$king cold but the sky is blue so I won’t complain much. Also, I kind of enjoy watching the frost on the grass, it looks very pretty and I like the crunchy sound it makes when I walk on it.

You already know I’m a bit stubborn and I can become quite obsessed about some things. I don’t quit so easily and when I get an idea in my head or want something, I can go pretty far to get it.
That’s why I spent several hours this weekend trying to translate from Latin, the inscription that’s at the entrance of the old mill in my town.

DENTE THEONINO RODAT ME LIVOR ACERBUS, NIL NOCET HOC, FACILIS SI DEUS UNUS ERIT.

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The online translators didn’t do a good job so I decided to look up word by word and try to understand the meaning myself.

DENTE: tooth, tusk, spike/ destructive power, envy, ill will/ repeatedly, closely, densely

THEONINO: Theon/ slander (verb and noun), slanderer

RODAT: gnaw, peck

ME: need, lack, want/ require, be without

LIVOR: bluish/ envy, spite, jealousy, grudge

ACERBUS: harsh, strident, bitter, sour, unripe, green, unfinished, grievous, gloomy, painful, severe, dark, rough, sarcastic, oppressive, incisive

NIL: nothing, no, nonsense, no concern, thing not worth mentioning

NOCET: harm, injure/ be aware of mischief (3rd person singular)

HOC: (this, present, the latter, actual, occasional)

FACILIS: easy, without difficulty, suitable, prosperous, ready, good natured, favorable, accessible, convenient, compliant, quick, light

SI: if, if only, whether

DEUS: god, divine being

UNUS: one,single/ same/ any,some/ an/ at the same time

ERIT: he-she-it will be

You can see that some words have multiple meanings and some of those meanings are not synonyms.
Probably the online translators pick a random meaning and you end up with a sentence that doesn’t have much sense.

I have to admit that I enjoyed trying to make the words connect like a puzzle.
Latin is a very complicated language. It has some grammatical forms that don’t exist in Spanish or English so it was very hard for me trying to understand some of the things I read.
Better said, I didn’t understand them at all.
What’s nominative, genitive, dative, ablative, vocative and accusative? I’m not really interested in learning that.

After a very long time connecting the pieces, I think that the meaning of that sentence could be translate like this:

“Slander (repeatedly) needs grudge to gnaw harshly, this cause no harm, if compliant God is there (at the same time)”

Something like: bad things exist, just keep the faith.

Now, why that inscription is at the entrance of the mill, it’ll always be a mystery to me.

And I was told that the mill was the studio of a famous painter of this area. Now the place is a museum where the work of the artist can be seen.
I also found out it’s called West Mill, opposite to the one that’s still working, that’s called East Mill.

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~ by DotedOn on November 28, 2016.

8 Responses to “825”

  1. No wonder Latin is so well studied. I wouldn’t have a clue!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This is very cool, Paola, and I just KNOW I’ll end up distracted by its puzzling nature. I already copied the list into a document! lol

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think I found a new hobby too 😀
      There is always something written in Latin and now I got very curious to know what everything means 🙂

      Like

      • Until I got your response, I’d actually forgotten about this! lol I’m busy and forget things from one minute to the next. I think I saved the doc to my desktop and when I come across it, I may look at it again 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • There are many Latin-English dictionaries online, some of them are very good. I forgot to save the websites but I think you can find them easily 🙂

        Like

  3. yay you kept on trying and i think it payed off! You are so determined! 🙂 ❤ xoxoxo

    Liked by 1 person

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